Play

We all have an innate drive to play, and this impulse is one of our most natural and effortless sources of joy. And the most playful shapes, the ones found in hula hoops and beach balls, carousels and merry-go-rounds, are circles and spheres. Research shows that a part of the brain called the amygdala, associated in part with fear and anxiety, lights up when people look at angular objects but stays quiet when they look at curved ones. In a manmade world defined by endless right angles, rounded shapes set our minds at ease and invite our playful inner child out into the open.

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The radical act of releasing judgment

Hidden signs you’re headed for burnout — and how to stop it

5 ways my work has changed my life

How envy can help you find more joy

How to dress for the joy you want

A playful way to problem-solve

There’s no perfect home. But there are lots of joyful ones.

A yellow bench with blue blankets and throw pillow in the home of Ingrid Fetell Lee, photographed by Johnny Miller.

3 questions to ask when your house doesn’t feel like a home

What's killing your joy? Take this 3-minute quiz and find out.
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